Fishers Point Walk, part two

posted in: Tasmania

Recap.  Best walk ever, along the coast in Tasmania, as far as south as you can go.  Part one is here. There was a giant pile of rocks at the end of the walk. It begged to be climbed. How Many More Minutes? ~ Tasmania: Fishers Point Walk, part two We walked around the bend, both of us girls had our gorgeous pink laces on. How Many More Minutes? ~ Tasmania: Fishers Point Walk, part two We were greeted with a beautiful scene of lichen-covered rocks.  And a fairy house or two. How Many More Minutes? ~ Tasmania: Fishers Point Walk, part two I do try to convince the kids they are fairy houses.  They humour me by at least calling them by the same name. How Many More Minutes? ~ Tasmania: Fishers Point Walk, part two The kids commenced exploring.  Plenty of tide pools to examine. How Many More Minutes? ~ Tasmania: Fishers Point Walk, part two How Many More Minutes? ~ Tasmania: Fishers Point Walk, part two I’m not sure I can call this a fairy house.  We’re told this is part of a fishing boat. How Many More Minutes? ~ Tasmania: Fishers Point Walk, part two It would have been nice to walk to that next point but it would have added too much to our walk that day. How Many More Minutes? ~ Tasmania: Fishers Point Walk, part two So beautiful! How Many More Minutes? ~ Tasmania: Fishers Point Walk, part two How Many More Minutes? ~ Tasmania: Fishers Point Walk, part two How Many More Minutes? ~ Tasmania: Fishers Point Walk, part two On our way back we followed the path to the ruins of the pilots station. How Many More Minutes? ~ Tasmania: Fishers Point Walk, part twoHow Many More Minutes? ~ Tasmania: Fishers Point Walk, part two This is a pant-a-log.  In case you were wondering.  We keep an eye out for these wherever we go after seeing them months ago at the Sawpit Camping Area in Victoria.  LadyBug gets the credit for the name. How Many More Minutes? ~ Tasmania: Fishers Point Walk, part two A whaler’s grave.  A man who was also doing this walk told us that a grave for a whaler is rare, usually they were ‘buried’ at sea.  I don’t know how true that is, but it was interesting to see.  Much whaling occurred in this area.  The whale population is still recovering. How Many More Minutes? ~ Tasmania: Fishers Point Walk, part two The kids had been begging to put their feet in the water so we told them they could on the return trip.  The water was cold! How Many More Minutes? ~ Tasmania: Fishers Point Walk, part two We found numerous shells with perfect round holes on them.  I read somewhere this is due to snails.  They inject something into the shell which dissolves it so they can slurp up the contents inside. How Many More Minutes? ~ Tasmania: Fishers Point Walk, part two Did I mention this was the best walk ever? How Many More Minutes? ~ Tasmania: Fishers Point Walk, part two How Many More Minutes? ~ Tasmania: Fishers Point Walk, part two How Many More Minutes? ~ Tasmania: Fishers Point Walk, part two How Many More Minutes? ~ Tasmania: Fishers Point Walk, part two On the way home we saw these big ferns.  At the time we thought they were big, anyway.  Later walks in Tasmania showed us we were wrong, these aren’t that big in comparison! How Many More Minutes? ~ Tasmania: Fishers Point Walk, part two Here we go down the dirt road again for the long drive back.  So worth it. How Many More Minutes? ~ Tasmania: Fishers Point Walk, part two We were advised by another family that the kids wouldn’t enjoy our trip to Cockle Creek since there’s not much to do there.  A long drive from Snug for a quick look.  They recommended some other activities. I think what they meant is that their kids wouldn’t enjoy it.  We all had a lovely time, truly this was one of the most beautiful walks we’ve ever done.  Such tranquility walking along the beach and so much to explore.  There was another walk which would have taken us in a southwest direction to the coast.  I would have loved to do that, but it was something like a five hour return.  Not enough time in the day what with the car ride and the extra time it takes to hike with young kids.  We definitely plan to return to Tasmania at some point when the kids are older, I hope to do the other walk then!

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