Tahune AirWalk

posted in: Tasmania

Here’s a map of the southeast part of Tasmania.  See Hobart at the top?  Under that is Kingston.  We were camping in Snug which is just south of Kingston.  At the bottom of the map you’ll see Cockle Creek, where we’d been the day before.  The day we went to the Tahune AirWalk we stopped in Geeveston for tickets and  a trip through their Forest & Heritage Centre.  Then we went on to Tahune, you can see it on the left of the map.  It was another long drive, and it started to rain on the way.  Perfect for a day walking through the forest! Tahune AirWalk ~ How Many More Minutes? There was a small room that had some things on display.  There was a video showing, but we didn’t spend long in there and I don’t remember what it was about.  The kids weren’t very interested, even in the fossils.  So we headed outside. Tahune AirWalk ~ How Many More Minutes? When you see pictures of this place it’s usually of the cantilever which is part of the treetop walk.  (Those pictures are in the next post!) But you can also walk out to the swinging bridges which are so fun and not to be missed. Tahune AirWalk ~ How Many More Minutes? Tahune AirWalk ~ How Many More Minutes? Tahune AirWalk ~ How Many More Minutes?Tahune AirWalk ~ How Many More Minutes? There are two bridges, two rivers to cross.  The water was moving very swiftly.  Very swiftly. You would not want to get caught in one of these. Tahune AirWalk ~ How Many More Minutes? Tahune AirWalk ~ How Many More Minutes? Tahune AirWalk ~ How Many More Minutes? The walk back from the swinging bridges was beautiful.  The way there, not so much.  Just a wide, level path.  The kids complained the whole way to the first bridge.  The other side we heard no complaints.  There was much to explore with so many things to look at and a varied path through the forest. Tahune AirWalk ~ How Many More Minutes? It started raining during our walk.  Not hard, fortunately.  It was a bit cold.  SkeeterBug was trying to keep warm but had a hand to hold. Tahune AirWalk ~ How Many More Minutes? A cute toddler.  With a stick.  Want to keep a toddler happy?  Give him a stick.  Only when he’s outside, of course. Tahune AirWalk ~ How Many More Minutes? JitterBug lost his jumper somewhere in Victoria before we came to Tasmania.  At this point we hadn’t found him a new one so he borrowed Dad’s vest to try to keep his head dry.  (I don’t think this is called a vest in Australia, but I’m not sure what else to call it!) Tahune AirWalk ~ How Many More Minutes? Such beautiful scenery! Tahune AirWalk ~ How Many More Minutes?Tahune AirWalk ~ How Many More Minutes? Tahune AirWalk ~ How Many More Minutes? Tahune AirWalk ~ How Many More Minutes?Tahune AirWalk ~ How Many More Minutes? Tahune AirWalk ~ How Many More Minutes? Tahune AirWalk ~ How Many More Minutes? Tahune AirWalk ~ How Many More Minutes?Tahune AirWalk ~ How Many More Minutes? We finally made our way to the treetop walk, the part with the actual airwalk.  I’m putting that in another post.  I always seem to have so many pictures! 

  1. […] Here’s part one. By the time we made it near the treetop walk we were getting tired, and the kids were starting to complain again.  Fortunately we ran into some people who pointed us in a different direction than the map was telling us to go.  We went in the back way to the airwalk, but it was closer and saved us a few steps. It’s very hard to portray how high up we were.  The walkways were covered in chicken wire to make them less slippery.  Thank goodness, since it was raining off and on while we were there.  The railings on either side were at a safe height and there were no gaps, so I didn’t have to worry the kids were going to walk off the edge.  TurboBug rather enjoyed the sound his shoes made on the walkway, so I could always tell where he was.  😉 This is the end of the cantilever.  There’s a picture of the whole thing if you scroll down a few pictures. From the end you get this gorgeous view of the two rivers coming together.  These are the same two rivers we crossed on the swinging bridges earlier. The space at the end of the cantilever is not a large space.  And of course, being the star attraction, it’s right where everyone wanted to be, so we had to move on before long.  TurboBug’s totally glaring at the guy taking our picture.  Love it.  (Shhh…come closer….can I just tell you that I’ve lost weight since then?  Yay!) Here’s a shot of the whole cantilever portion of the airwalk.  You can see someone right at the end.  We were up above most of the trees.  I almost like this view of the rivers better than the one at the end of the walkway! There was quite a bit of elevated pathway, more than I expected. I love the way ferns appear from above.  Like giant green flowers. We came upon this wishing tree.  You could throw a coin over the edge as you made a wish.  The idea was to get the coin to land on the top of the tree stump.  (Is it still called a stump when it’s this tall?)  The proceeds went to a charity. I have to show you these mushrooms that were on the trail as we made our way down from the walkway.  Aren’t they cool? This is the wishing tree from the ground.  Seems taller than it looked from the other picture!  The kids were wishing they could collect (and pocket!) the coins all over the ground. The airwalk was hit with flooding a few years back.  See the bottom left picture?  That’s one of the swinging bridges we crossed.  Complete change of subject…I managed to get a picture of a pademelon roadsign that day!  Yay!  I had never even heard of pademelons before we came to Tasmania.  They’re basically extra small wallabies.  Unfortunately we saw many, many of these as roadkill, but this was the only roadsign I remember seeing for them.  I’m thinking they need more signs.  Not that it would help. I’m glad we went to the airwalk, though we thought it was a bit pricey.  There is another short walk you can do and some bike trails.  You can also camp there, and you can pay to do an Eagle hang glide. We thought this was a unique attraction and one we’d all enjoy, so it was worth the drive for us. […]

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